Chinese Seal Carving

In China and in whole East Asia to a large extent, a signature is not sufficient to prove your legal identity. Opening a bank account in China requires 10 or more stampings with your personal seal. In Japan, going out without your seal is like leaving your cell phone at home.

The red seal you see on many Chinese works of art and literature is not just for decoration, it actually contains the creator or studio’s signature! The seal was first introduced in the Shang Dynasty (1760 -1520 BCE) as a way for government officials to sign off on important documents, but eventually became an inseparable symbol of Chinese art and culture.

In fact, in many Asian countries, a signature is not sufficient to prove your legal identity. Opening a bank account in China requires 10 or more stampings with your personal seal. In Japan, going out without your seal is like leaving your cell phone at home.

Check out the works of master seal carver Li Yingquan from Liaocheng, who intricately carved pieces of jade or precious stones so that they would yield a clean, beautiful mark. This skill requires an immense amount of focus, dedication, and careful precision, making it one of the most impressive and recognizable intangible cultural-heritages from China!

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山东省文化和旅游厅 Shandong Provincial Department of Culture and Tourism

美国友康科技有限公司 U-Combination Technology (USA) Inc.

Authorized agency for Shandong Provincial Department of Culture and Tourism in the U.S.
(山东省文化和旅游厅在美授权机构)

150 E Swedesford Rd, Suite 101,
Wayne, PA 19087